astronomy, NASA, photos, space

Jupiter Cloud Animation from Juno

How do Jupiter’s clouds move? To help find out, images taken with NASA’s Juno spacecraft during its last pass near Jupiter have been analyzed and digitally extrapolated into a time-lapse video. The eight-second time-lapse video, digitally extrapolated between two images taken only nine minutes apart, estimates how Jupiter’s clouds move over 29 hours. Abstractly, the result appears something like a psychedelic paisley dream. Scientifically, however, the computer animation shows that circular storms tend to swirl, while bands and zones appear to flow. This overall motion is not surprising and has been seen on time-lapse videos of Jupiter before, although never in this detail. The featured region spans about four times the area of Jupiter’s Great Red Spot. Results from Juno are showing, unexpectedly, that Jupiter’s weather phenomena can extend deep below its cloud tops. via NASA
https://apod.nasa.gov/apod/ap180521.html
astronomy, NASA, photos, space

In the Heart of the Tarantula Nebula

In the heart of monstrous Tarantula Nebula lies huge bubbles of energetic gas, long filaments of dark dust, and unusually massive stars. In the center of this heart, is a knot of stars so dense that it was once thought to be a single star. This star cluster, labeled as R136 or NGC 2070, is visible just above the center of the featured image and home to a great number of hot young stars. The energetic light from these stars continually ionizes nebula gas, while their energetic particle wind blows bubbles and defines intricate filaments. The representative-color picture, a digital synthesis of images from the NASA/ESA orbiting Hubble Space Telescope and ESO’s ground-based New Technology Telescope, shows great details of the LMC nebula’s tumultuous center. The Tarantula Nebula, also known as the 30 Doradus nebula, is one of the largest star-formation regions known, and has been creating unusually strong episodes of star formation every few million years. via NASA
https://apod.nasa.gov/apod/ap180520.html
astronomy, NASA, photos, space

Reflections of Venus and Moon

Posing near the western horizon, a brilliant evening star and slender young crescent shared reflections in a calm sea last Thursday after sunset. Recorded in this snapshot from the Atlantic beach at Santa Marinella near Rome, Italy, the lovely celestial conjunction of the two brightest beacons in the night sky could be enjoyed around the world. Seaside, light reflected by briefly horizontal surfaces of the gentle waves forms the shimmering columns across the water. Similar reflections by fluttering atmospheric ice crystals can create sometimes mysterious pillars of light. Of course, earthlight itself visibly illuminates the faint lunar night side. via NASA
https://apod.nasa.gov/apod/ap180519.html
NASA, news, space

UPDATE: NASA, Orbital ATK Now Targeting May 21 for Next Resupply Mission to Space Station

Orbital ATK, in conjunction with NASA, has moved the launch of its ninth contracted mission to the International Space Station to no earlier than 4:39 a.m. EDT Monday, May 21, to support further prelaunch inspections and more favorable weather conditions.

from NASA
http://www.nasa.gov/press-release/update-nasa-orbital-atk-now-targeting-may-21-for-next-resupply-mission-to-space
#NASA #news #photos #space #astronomy

NASA, news, space

NASA Awards Contract for Strategic Analysis, Communications Support

NASA has selected Abacus Technology Corporation of Chevy Chase, Maryland, to provide research, analysis and communications support services at the agency’s Marshall Space Flight Center in Huntsville, Alabama.

from NASA
http://www.nasa.gov/press-release/nasa-awards-contract-for-strategic-analysis-communications-support
#NASA #news #photos #space #astronomy

astronomy, NASA, photos, space

Milky Way vs Airglow Australis

Captured last week after sunset on a Chilean autumn night, an exceptional airglow floods this allsky view from Las Campanas Observatory. The airglow was so intense it diminished parts of the Milky Way as it arced horizon to horizon above the high Atacama desert. Originating at an altitude similar to aurorae, the luminous airglow is due to chemiluminescence, the production of light through chemical excitation. Commonly recorded in color by sensitive digital cameras, the airglow emission here is fiery in appearance. It is predominately from atmospheric oxygen atoms at extremely low densities and has often been present during southern hemisphere nights over the last few years. Like the Milky Way, on that dark night the strong airglow was very visible to the eye, but seen without color. Jupiter is brightest celestial beacon though, standing opposite the Sun and near the central bulge of the Milky Way rising above the eastern (top) horizon. The Large and Small Magellanic clouds both shine through the airglow to the lower left of the galactic plane, toward the southern horizon. via NASA
https://apod.nasa.gov/apod/ap180517.html