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Explosion of color takes over an abandoned Puerto Rican factory

An artist’s brilliance breathes new life into a desolate tobacco factory in Caguas, Puerto Rico. Bright sprays and colorful drips have seemingly exploded all over the factory’s formerly lifeless walls in local artist Sofia Maldonado’s eye-popping intervention, Kalaña. Created as part of Cromática: Caguas a Color, the community engagement piece transformed the building into a piece of art and new home to educational workshops, presentations, and other artistic events.

Puerto Rican…

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Disturbing photoshoot imagines our meals in a climate change-induced dystopia

If oodles of overwhelming studies doesn’t prove that climate change is real, perhaps a stark look into our future food supply might just do the trick. Photographer Allie Wist has created a bleak photo series, Flooded,

Related: Quebec food waste program to rescue 30.8 million pounds of food

+ Allie Wist

Via Gizmodo

Allie Wist, Flooded photography series, climate change effects, food shortage, global food shortage, climate change, dystopia, starvation, global climate effect…

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The sweet moment California got a record 50% of its electricity from solar

California is showing the awesome potential of scaled-up solar power to provide the United States and the world with clean, renewable electricity. For three hours on March 11 the state got 50 percent of its electricity from solar — 40 percent from large-scale solar power pants and 10 percent from distributed solar installations on homes and businesses.

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UK tests cheaper, longer-lasting roads made with recycled plastic

Around 24.8 million miles of roads crisscross the surface of Earth. But the polluting industry draws on oil to lay the roads. Engineer Toby McCartney came up with a solution to those roads and the growing problem of plastic pollution: plastic roads. His company, MacRebur, lays roads that are as much as 60 percent stronger than asphalt roads and last around 10 times longer.

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World’s first mobile recycling plant turns trash into tiles

What to do with all the trash we generate is a pressing problem all over the world, but it’s harder for isolated communities to recycle their trash. Taiwan-based architecture studio Miniwiz designed an environmentally friendly solution: TRASHPRESSO, an mobile recycling plant that can travel around the planet to bring recycling to far-flung communities.

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Plastic-eating caterpillar could revolutionize waste treatment

Spanish researchers have discovered that the wax worm, a caterpillar known for munching on the wax within beehives, is able to devour and biodegrade polyethylene plastic, converting it into a form of alcohol found in antifreeze.

Federica Bertocchini, a scientist at the Institute of Biomedicine and Biotechnology of Cantabria, first uncovered the worm’s unique abilities by chance, when she attempted to clean up a wax worm infestation in one of her home beehives. She placed the worms…

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Decrepit freight depot reborn as industrial-chic food lovers paradise in Malm

Swedish architects Wingårdh dramatically transformed a roofless freight depot into an industrial-chic market hall in Malmö, Sweden. The adaptive reuse and expansion project combines old bricks with Corten steel for a modern look that still pays homage to the 19th century building’s industrial roots. Located on Gibraltargatan, the 1,500-square-meter Malmö Market Hall caters to 20 stalls and cafes that celebrate the city’s melting-pot culture with its diversity of food.

Clients Nina…

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Giant ski slope to top green-roofed civic center in Beijing

The next time you visit Beijing you may want to get your sled ready. China’s ever-evolving capital will soon be home to a stunning new civic center topped with an artificial snow-covered slope perfect for skiing and sledding. Designed by architect Andrew Bromberg of Aedas, the civic center, called the China World Trade Center Phase 3C, will merge energy efficient principles with mixed-use programming that accommodates the arts, outdoor recreation, and even organic farming.

Set for completion…

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